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David Morris died this April, aged 51. He was working with the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games (LOCOG) as External Access and Inclusion Coordinator, on secondment from his job as a Senior Policy Advisor on Disability to the Mayor of London.

On the day after his death Disability Now reported tributes from many different people including Boris Johnson and Dame Tanni Grey-Thomson. Sebastian Coe, Chairman of LOCOG described him as "a life-enhancer who was very perceptive and funny."

David was the first disabled person to ever pass into the Civil Service Fast Stream. He had many interests and friends, particularly in the arts. He will be remembered by many as a fearless, passionate and inspirational proponent of disability rights.  


A tribute to David from the Equalities and Human rights Commission

With the sudden death of David Morris on Monday 19 April 2010 we lost a hero of the movement for equality and human rights. David helped shape the independent living movement in the 1980s and planned accessibility and inclusion for 'the largest gathering of disabled people in one city, on the planet, in history' as he put it when talking of London 2012.

He spoke out quietly and powerfully on the equal value of disabled and non-disabled people's lives and the risk that legalising assisted suicide would re-enforce unequal value. He challenged disabled people too, to be more serious in addressing accessibility for people with neuro-diverse and mental health conditions. He had the courage to press for change, the thoughtfulness to do so effectively, the humour to engage people positively. David was astute, reflective, humane - and also hugely supportive to many friends and colleagues who will miss his intelligence and his spark.

We are the poorer for his passing - but so much the richer for his contributions to equality and human rights in this country.

Liz Sayce

Commission's Disability Committee  



To the right are three pictures of David kindly supplied by his friend, the artist Katherine Araniello.

Click here to see this site’s page on David’s vision for a Paralympic Inclusive Environment and here for more on the background to his involvement with the development of betteraccess.org and 1 City, Many People.

Copyright for betteraccess.org and 1 City Many People resides with thinkofthefuture.com @ Seedgen Ltd.